Monday, 27 February 2017

And the award goes to...


OK, it's not the Oscars but, after last night's fiasco, it is probably better managed. Following our recent garlanding by Lux Magazine, we now find similar honours bestowed on us by Industry Insight Monthly, a quarterly publication which considers itself a resource tool for industry. I am not entirely sure what this means but they do have the same mailing address as Lux and, like Lux, they would like me to pay for a crystal trophy (a snip at £250) or give them some money for something or other (to be fair their is a free package but you have to look hard to find any reference to The Big Red Wine Company!).

Anyway, I suppose I should be overjoyed at all this recognition and I can confirm that, when the results are officially published, on top of all the titles I was awarded by Lux, I am now...

Best Fine Wine Retailer - East Anglia

Wednesday, 15 February 2017

Venison with...?

I have been asked to blog more about wine with food and, as someone who enjoys cooking, I hope this will enliven things around here! Appropriate to the time of year, today I am writing about venison.

Venison is popular in our house - with me, anyway. Buying it a side at a time (from Archers Butchers in Norwich) is a highly cost effective way to fill the freezer with the healthiest of meats. Compared with beef, it's leaner, has about half the calories and a fifth of the total fat and one-sixth of the saturated fat of the equivalent beef. It has around 10% more protein and higher levels of vitamins and minerals although it is around 20% higher in cholesterol.

My freezer is currently bursting at the seams with various cuts and, consequently, I have to think up different ways to present it to my family who, unlike me, would get rather bored of a slab of meat with some sort of carbs and greens put in front of them several nights each week.

1. Venison mince

Mincing the scraps with one part pork belly to two parts venison makes a good burger mixture (although, of course, this can longer lay claim to a low fat option) and also makes a good, richer pasta sauce etc. I would serve appropriate wines with these - such as Cascina Saria's Barbera d'Asti 'S. Lorenzo' which has both the fruit and acidity to cut through the tomato in the ragu sauce.

For a low fat option, I mince the venison on its own and cook it up with Indian spices and add grated onion and toasted pine nuts then wrap it in small samosa parcels using spring roll pastry (there may be something more appropriate but this works fine). I bake these rather than the traditional deep frying and serve them with a pumpkin or squash chutney I heard about on the radio around Hallowe'en. It's quite spicy with the chutney but a fruity Syrah such as a Crozes-Hermitage from Xavier Vignon or Domaine de la Charite works well.

Something else I have tried recently is a beef and potato cake (but using venison, of course) from a rather fun cookbook called 'Persiana'. These are easy to make (mashed potato with minced venison which has been cooked up with mild spices then coated in breadcrumbs and shallow fried to seal then finished off in the oven) and work brilliantly with a simple fruity wine - again Xavier (this time his Turkish Cabernet-Mourvedre) and Charite (the 2015 Cotes du Rhone) come to mind.


Monday, 13 February 2017

2015 Burgundy - is there enough?

January is traditionally the month for tasting and buying the new vintage of Burgundy, wines which are mostly still in tanks and barrels, having been harvested only 15 months earlier. This year was the turn of the much heralded 2015s. This was a year in which not much could go wrong and, on the evidence of the wines I have tasted, very little did.

For me, I tasted extensively in the Chalonnaise, especially around Givry - I wanted to ensure that Domaine Joblot continues to be the best (it does) and, as a consumer, I have to consider that these are wines I can actually afford to drink. I also went to the so-called Ozgundians tasting in Soho where three Australians who make excellent (but by no means cheap) Burgundies were showing off their 2015s. A handful of other wines tasted confirmed, with all the above, that this is one of the great vintages. But you don't need me to tell you that when it's all over the wine press.

What I can tell you about is the excellent 2015s from Domaine Joblot. Juliette is increasingly at the helm of her family's estate and she is continuing with the outstanding reputation built up by her father and uncle. The Servoisine Blanc is drinkable already but could really do with a few years longer in the bottle. Tasted alongside the 2013 and 2014 of the same cuvee, 2013 was ready to drink (but no hurry), followed by the 2015 with the longer-lived 2014 needing more time (or more air!) to bypass the lean minerality of this classic vintage, so good for white Burgundy.

The four Premier Cru reds were tasted alongside each other over a period of five days. First, the Bois Chevaux, light and pretty but, at first, overpowered by the oak. This will fade into the background (as it did by day four) - witness, for example, the 2010 which I have been enjoying on more than one occasion this year (see previous post). My notes for this are consistent: a delicious Pinot, fleshed out and well balanced with fruit that draws you in. Not perfect, perhaps - certainly some tasters will strive to find flaws but, frankly, why bother? It's perfectly enjoyable and, for me, that's enough.

Cellier aux Moines and Servoisine are, classically, the two great wines from this estate. Neither is better than the other but there is a little difference in their styles with the former offering a little more structure and, presumably, longevity whilst the latter has slightly richer fruit. It doesn't really matter which one you opt for as both are going to give the 2015 Gevreys a run for their money when they have grown up. For now, both are impenetrable though: the tannins of 2015 are quite impressive! By day three, they were beginning to be more merciful and by the end of the week, the final glasses hinted at the great pleasure to follow in three or four years.

Finally the Clos Marole. Why? Simply because it is the first to be bottled and, as such, is the most forward at this stage. We also tasted it alongside the 2014 which was a 'Coup de Coeur' in the Revue du Vin de France's 2017 Guide which described its

"very beautiful aromas remind us of raspberry jam. Beautiful consistency on the palate for this pure juice. Its tannins, already well coated will refine over the next few years. This impressive wine shows the great mastery of pinot."

Well, we enjoyed it anyway. And the 2015 was, as expected, the most forward and in a similar style - although I would suggest 'black raspberry jam' as a more accurate descriptor.