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2013 Joblot revisited gives an answer to the biodynamics question

In the end, I opened both of Domaine Joblot's 2013 Givry Premier Crus, Servoisine and Clos du Cellier aux Moines, on Thursday. Both were fantastic wines, much better than on previous occasions. The differences between the two sites were apparent - Servoisine's density and power coupled with sweeter fruit against Cellier aux Moines' elegance and poise - but the vintage, never one of the most venerated in any part of Burgundy (anywhere?), has proved itself worthy of the Joblot name on this occasion, at least.

The last time I tried Servoisine was not a "wine night" according to the biodynamic calendar and the flavours were muted, muddied even. On Thursday the fruit in both cuvees was ablaze, vibrant and the acidity levels were good, making for wines that danced on the palate. I will be reserving more of these for myself but following the advice of the wine app, money well spent.

Since Thursday, a few other corks have been popped including Pierre Gaillard's 2015 Cote Rotie special cuvees. I won't brag. They were fabulous and amazingly forward. Enough said.

Now the weather seems to be improving or, at least, levelling out, I wanted to try I Campi's 2018 Lugana again, especially since I have, somewhat incredibly, managed to get a pallet from this outstanding estate into the country amid the Coronavirus lockdown. There will be a special offer on this in the next few days and anyone who enjoys an extremely well made white wine should take heed and loosen their purse strings. We had this with a simple roast chicken (Simon Hopkinson style) on Sunday and it was as perfect a match as I could envisage. Most of the wines coming in from I Campi are the same vintages as before but I am looking forward to the 2016 Ripasso, another The Bicchieri winner.


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